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Running Tenants of the King Online

Posted in: Blog

Many of us are turning to online activities at the moment as a way of staying connected to each other. If you would like to ‘meet’ virtually with others from your church then why not run an online Tenants of the King Bible Study? Read on for suggestions on how to run the bible study using a web-based conference calling platform called Zoom.

Setting up Zoom

Zoom is the online conferencing platform used by Operation Noah. There are other conferencing platforms out there you could consider, we just happen to use this one. At the moment Zoom is offering resources to help people get up to speed with using their facilities. You will need to set up an account, but can use it for free if you don’t mind having your conference in 40 minute sessions, as it times out after 40 minutes and everyone simply clicks the same link to meet up again.

How to run the course

1.Order your Tenants of the King Study Guides and videos

Order enough booklets and videos on usb stick for everyone, and deliver or post them to your group members. You are welcome to share one usb stick between different groups. However, you may want to order one usb per group, to save having to pass it round.

2. Keep it small

To ensure everyone has a chance to share their thoughts, aim for 10 or fewer people in the group, just as you would with a face-to-face group. If interest is high, form two or three groups that meet at different times, providing more alternatives for people with busy schedules.

3. Expect technical mishaps

Bad wifi-connectivity and poor sound quality are bound to happen. Expect them, and it won’t be so bad when they occur. Spend time before your first study checking everyone’s equipment and helping them learn how to use it. It often helps to be connected by Zoom, or whatever platform you are using, and telephone at the same time. People may need to purchase microphones, speakers or headsets. Perhaps there are a few people in your group who could help do this. Give yourself 30 mins in your first session to iron out technical issues and remind people how to use the platform.

4. How to run the session

Begin by ensuring everyone can see and hear each other. You may need to ask people to mute themselves when they are not speaking, or the host may need to mute people – politely tell people that this is what you are going to do for some, if not all, of the meeting. During the discussion sections you may want to ask people to use the ‘hand raising’ option so as to allow all to have a chance of speaking.

The leader, who might be a different group member each week, runs the session using the leaders’ notes. When the video is played, for Zoom, this can be shown using the sharing option, described here

5. Keep to time

Being online rather than in-person is more tiring. Keep the session to time – two lots of 40 minute sessions, if you are using the free version of Zoom, or two hours maximum. This may mean firm chairing, but your group will thank you! Perhaps offer to add on another 40 minutes session at the end for people who want to chat after the session is over.

6. Feedback

Finally, do let us know how you got on, with any suggestions for improvement of these tips!

Operation Noah Calls for a Just Recovery from Covid-19

Posted in: Blog

Operation Noah has joined hundreds of other organisations around the world to call for a Just Recovery from Covid-19.

We have signed an open letter written by 350.org calling for responses to the pandemic at every level to uphold five principles that will ensure a just recovery and help us transition to a better future. The five principles are:

  1. Put people’s health first, no exceptions.
  2. Provide economic relief directly to the people.
  3. Help our workers and communities, not corporate executives.
  4. Create resilience for future crises.
  5. Build solidarity and community across borders – do not empower authoritarians.

Individuals are also welcome to sign the letter here.

Ecocide: Will the Church dare to be prophetic again?

Posted in: Blog, Featured
Date posted: 6 January 2020

By Holly-Anna Petersen, Operation Noah trustee.

I call myself a Christian because I am in love with the character of our Christ. I am captivated by Jesus’ gritty drive for righteousness, which led him to prophetically call out the powers of the time – an act which he knew would ultimately lead to not only his arrest but his execution. I love that this sets the challenge in my day to day of how I can be deeper and braver in how I love.

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Film review: The Biggest Little Farm

Posted in: Blog, Featured
Date posted: 13 December 2019

I was fortunate enough to see an early viewing of the Oscar-contending documentary The Biggest Little Farm. The Biggest Little Farm tells the story of Molly and John Chester and their dream of creating a sustainable farm with maximum diversity of plants and animals, to regenerate the land as well as their lives.

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Fire and flood: Fallout of a broken climate

Posted in: Blog, Featured

This post is written by our guest blogger Bill McGuire. He is Professor Emeritus of Geophysical & Climate Hazards at UCL and author of Waking the Giant: How a Changing Climate Triggers Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Volcanic Eruptions. He was a contributor to the IPCC 2012 report on Climate Change & Extreme Events and Disasters. His new book is Knock Three Times: 28 Modern Folk Tales for a World in Trouble; a short-story anthology co-edited with Andrew Simms.

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Climate breakdown: Despatches from the front line

Posted in: Blog
Date posted: 18 October 2019

This post is written by our guest blogger Bill McGuire. Bill McGuire is Professor Emeritus of Geophysical & Climate Hazards at UCL and author of Waking the Giant: How a Changing Climate Triggers Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Volcanic Eruptions. He was a contributor to the IPCC 2012 report on Climate Change & Extreme Events and Disasters.

The battle against climate breakdown is being fought across the planet, from the wildfire-ravaged bush of Australia and California, to the hurricane-lashed Bahamas and monsoon-swamped India. But the front line in this intensifying battle is, without doubt, to be found where the land meets the sea. Here, in the coastal zone, are located many – if not most – of the world’s great cities and countless smaller communities. Close to 700 million people in all.

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‘Once in a Lifetime: Climate Justice Summit’, Cambridge 23-25 September 2019

Posted in: Blog

by Nicky Bull (Chair of Trustees, Operation Noah)

I was fortunate enough to be able to attend ‘Once in a Lifetime’ for two days in September. Organised jointly by Amos Trust and A Rocha UK, it brought together a wide range of people to explore how churches, Christians and other people of faith can play a greater role in addressing climate change with justice, to accelerate a ‘just transition’ to a low-carbon world.

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